There are many types of aviation fuel systems that vary in size and complexity depending on the aircraft in which they are installed. The simplest fuel systems consist of a gravity feed fuel tank with the appropriate fuel lining connecting it to the engine. More modern, multi-engine passenger or cargo aircraft feature fuel systems with multiple fuel tanks on the wing, fuselage, both of these, or even the empennage. In these configurations, individual tanks are equipped with internal Fuel Pumps with valves and plumbing that guide the fuel to the engines, allow for refueling & defueling, isolate individual tanks, and even allow for fuel dumping to optimize aircraft center of gravity. Because the fuel system is such an important component for the function of any aircraft, protecting it is critical. This blog will identify some of the threats to the fuel system, how they can hurt the aircraft, and how to defend against them.


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Transformers are a very important tool in the Electrical Industry. They are used as a passive device for transferring electrical energy from one circuit to another electrical circuit. When working in the electrical power system field, you have the advantage of selecting from a long list of transformers. You can choose transformers made for distribution, transmission, power generation, instrumental and many more. For a brief outline on the types of transformers available, see below.


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The term for an airplane on the ground navigating an airstrip or runway is called taxiing. However, this term does not include the high-speed run an aircraft takes on the runway before taking off and the decelerating run just after landing. When moving on a runway, large aircraft are steered with the help of a tiller. An aircraft tiller is a steering wheel in the cockpit that works similarly to a car steering wheel but looks nothing like it. The tiller is actually a small wheel or crank that lies usually to the side of the pilot and can be operated with one hand (two hands are not required) to turn the wheels of an aircraft.


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Firefighters are one of the many important heroes of our society. They never hesitate to risk their lives to protect our loved ones, buildings, animals, and much more. When it comes to aircraft and airport fires, the firefighters that serve to protect our livelihood and belongings are the same in their dedication to others. Their differences, however, lie in their training, equipment, and procedures for how they implement fire safety. In this blog, we will discuss how firefighters work to protect the aviation world.


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Measuring the airspeed of an aircraft during flight is critical to both the safe operation of the vehicle, as well as for the wellbeing of the passengers and crew. Flying too slow can often cause an airplane to stall, especially at higher angles of critical attack. Flying too fast can also prove detrimental as it may compromise the structure of an aircraft. Whether an aircraft’s cockpit utilizes a steam gauge or is comprised of modern glass instruments, all planes utilize a pitot tube in order to measure airspeed.


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Did you know that one short round-trip flight from San Francisco to Los Angeles accounts for nearly 200 pounds of carbon emissions? Flight is unquestionably a marvel of engineering and a convenience that has connected the entire world, but it would be irresponsible to suggest it hasn’t had an effect on the environment. Just as car manufacturers have begun to make the switch to electric power, we may soon see the same trend in aviation  manufacturers as well. Pioneering aviation startups all over the world are working to eliminate the need for fuel in flight and we are now closer than ever to fully-electric aviation.


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During the airplane safety check of your most recent flight, you may have found yourself asking, “why on earth do I have to wear a seatbelt in here?" At cruising altitude, you don't have to worry about a fender bender, and planes are statistically far safer than cars. But much like a car experiences bumps on the road, a plane experiences bumps in the air. These bumps, known as turbulence, are the reason everyone from passenger to pilot is buckled in.


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The U.S. military is an organization that produces nearly $41 billion in revenue, has 8 supply chains, and 5 million items. It would make economical sense therefore, for a manufacturer of aerospace and military parts to want to do business with the U.S. military. To do business with the U.S. military however, you must obtain a Commercial and Government Entity Code obtained through the Defense Logistics Agency. Every manufacturer who does business with the military has a CAGE code,a unique 5-digit alphanumeric code. CAGE codes are free and are relatively straight-forward to acquire. Though issued by the U.S. DLA, manufacturers in other countries can be assigned a NATO Commercial and Government Entity Code (NCAGE), which are legitimate under the NATO Codification System (NCS).


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Whether you are driving a motorbike, Formula 1 car, or aircraft, one of the things that are you most reliant upon is the braking system. The basic principle of an aircraft braking system is to absorb energy from the moving system in order to slow the moving vehicle down. A key component of most braking systems is the anti-skid system. Skidding is sliding across a surface with little-to-no control. Skidding is often associated with the phrase ‘locked up’, which is in reference to the wheels of the vehicle. In most circumstances skidding in an automobile isn’t a desirable occurrence. In Formula 1 it could lose a race, on an aircraft it could result in an aircraft sliding off a runway.


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The distinction between “tailwheel” and “nosewheel” aircraft is the position of the aircraft’s landing gear on its fuselage. An aircraft with a tailwheel is designed with two main landing gear that are placed forward of the aircraft’s center of gravity, or in front of the aircraft, with a single aircraft tailwheel in the rear of the airplane to support the tail. This is different from nosewheel (also called tricycle) landing gear arrangements, where the main wheels are placed behind the center of gravity, and the aircraft nose gear supports it in the front.


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If not in flight, any pilot wishes for the aircraft to be on the ground and in the correct place. The last thing any airport worker needs is a runaway plane on the runway. Brakes stop or slow the motion of a machine. Often a machine keeps running and is only stopped from moving forward by pressing on brake pads. For example, in an automatic car, the driver must keep their foot on the brake pedal to stop the car moving forward at a red light or in traffic.


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In-flight entertainment was very different when commercial flight first became popular. For example, in 1936, the Hindenburg aircraft offered a piano, lounge, dining room, smoking room, and a bar. Shortly thereafter, airlines began offering movie projections and music during long flights. Throughout the years, amenities have become much more advanced. 


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Automatic flight controls are now considered a standard feature in general and commercial aviation. A pilot might depend on an autopilot system for a variety of tasks, such as guiding an aircraft on a programmed route, maintaining a determined altitude, or aircraft landing (currently, these systems are not employed during takeoff).


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In little over 100 years, the evolution of flight has come a long way. The Wright Brothers shocked the world by creating the first heavier-than-air aircraft capable of controlled sustained flight, despite only managing to fly for 12 seconds. In this day and age, manufacturing giants like Airbus and Boeing are shocking the world with how much they are advancing the field of aerospace. By improving the design and decreasing the weight of aircraft parts, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) have been able to create more efficient and aerodynamic aircraft. Since first flight was achieved in 1903, mankind has been using technological advancements to turn aerospace into an incredibly fast-paced and growing industry.


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